Caving in Meghalaya – Closer to the core

Do you know: Meghalaya has the subcontinent’s longest and deepest of caves and is in World’s top 10 caving destinations? Every year expert cavers across the globe visit this place to explore, research and find newer caves. Although not experts, we thought of exploring one of the caves near to Cherrapunji.

Harshit tells you more:

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism
Harshit and Surrbhi inside the cave | Photograph: Anirban Saha

“We reached Krem Mawmluh at around 10.30 AM on 29 September, 2014. It has been more than a month since we left that place but the place hasn’t left us yet. We are still thrilled and satisfied.

This post is about our caving experience. ‘Closer to the core‘ because at some point while going in I felt I was actually walking towards the core of the earth. We started out at 9.30 AM from lower Sohra, a little later than was planned. Gregory had reached exactly at 9.00 AM to pick us up. He heads Meghalaya Adventure Tours and is an expert caver. We were lucky that we went with him.

About Krem Mawmluh – It is a seven kilometers long cave in Cherrapunji, Meghalaya. It’s not a show cave or a tourist cave. People do not go there for sightseeing. Entering the cave requires proper gear and supervision. Adventure seekers will go to any height (or depth) for that thrill and experience.

On reaching Mawmluh Cement Factory, we got off the car, and were given our gear. I got excited by just looking at the gear.. It was a jumpsuit, more like what miners wear along with superb rubber boots. I realized its importance once I got into it. We got suited and felt great in dirty, ragged clothes for the first time. We took a customary selfie before the start. And the next moment we were walking towards the cave.

Caving in Meghalaya, Krem lu
The start of the walk | Caving in Meghalaya
Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta
The first part of the walk | Caving in Meghalaya
Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh
The view from the hill | Caving in Meghalaya
Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh
“second half is like going into the Amazon forest.” | Caving in Meghalaya
Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Surrbhi Koul
Preparation before entering the cave | Caving in Meghalaya

 

It’s a long walk to the entrance of the cave. First half is just walking along a hill through thick grass, second half is like going into the Amazon forest. It was challenging but fun! The rocks were huge. Throughout that time I felt like Bear Grylls from Man vs Wild. It was a hot day and the walk was a little tiring. But I forgot everything about it the moment I saw the entrance to the cave. We decided to take a little rest and some more preparations before entering the cave. We put on the lights on our helmets cause that’s the only way you can see anything inside the cave. Took water, some food and put our valuables inside the Darren Drum (An air tight container, which can float in water logged areas in the cave). The cave has a narrow tricky entrance. Seeing it made me think how tricky will the ways inside be. A narrow way through which one can only enter if they turn to the right and bend forward.

 

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta
The entrance | Caving in Meghalaya

 

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta
The entrance to the Cave | Caving in Meghalaya

 

It can be difficult for people who are fat. Right after that narrow space between rocks, there is suddenly no ground. Flexibility, fitness and energy are very important. Rocks and walls have to be used for support at places and move forward. After one or two climbs and falls, we started getting a hang of it. Strategically placing legs to shift body weight and using hands to grip the rocks were what it was all about. If I think too hard I might also be able to explain how we crossed every drop and climb from the beginning but I’m not writing a DIY Caving blog post.

 

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta
“Right after that narrow space between rocks, there is suddenly no ground.” | www.anirbansaha.com
Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta
The ground down below | www.anirbansaha.com

Some portions of the cave were very small and narrow. We had to bend down and walk or else our head would hit the ceiling. Without the helmet you’d come out with a part of your skull in your hands. Cavers are extremely careful not to break or spoil any sandstone or limestone formations in the cave when they enter. Those formations take hundreds of years to form. I made it a point not to hit my head anywhere and not break anything. You can only see in one direction at a time. As far as your light range allows. Everything else remains pitch black. For some this could be an uncomfortable situation. Surrbhi at first thought she was claustrophobic. After a few minutes she felt like she was a cave dweller in her previous birth. There are many phobias we think we have, most of those are because it is something we have never really tried before.

Along with adrenaline I think some other brain fluids too start flowing when you’re doing something adventurous for the first time. While calculating and analyzing every step I was taking to move forward, I started realizing something. I get weird ideas all the time. I realized we are all very used to living in a controlled environment and we try to make it more controlled every single day. It was when I was out there in an environment so different and I had nothing under my control, I realized that the life I’m living is narrower than the cave. Everything is huge and vast but still it is all controlled and restricted. In the cave anything can go wrong any moment. If you love the controlled environment you live in, cave is a hostile place for you . If you love freedom, and if you like being vulnerable then the cave is action packed. As we walked in we came across many interesting formations. Just water, limestone and sandstone work in mysterious ways to create exquisite formations. We saw cave pearls being formed. Water droplets fall into a bowl and somehow create small white pearls. We saw white shiny marble inside brown sharp rocks. Due to some minerals, some of the rocks were sparkling and shining. We saw a huge Swiss Cheesecake. It is a rock formation that is white and brown, looks like a cheesecake due to the texture and color.

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism
Cave Pearls | Caving in Meghalaya

As we kept moving forward we saw more interesting formations. It’s hard to believe how things like that are formed over the years. But a human in his entire lifetime will hardly see any changes in the cave. The changes are slow and difficult to find. That is why it’s all so precious. We soon reached the Gold Fish Pond. There is no fish inside the cave, but cavers give names to different sections of the cave, just for the sake of reference I suppose. The gold fish pond was dangerous. The darkness didn’t allow us to see how big the pond really was. But we were supposed to walk into it.

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism
In the wonderland | Photograph: Anirban Saha

 

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism
Water dripping down the walls | Caving in Meghalaya

 

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism, Suurbhi Koul
Surrbhi stepping down | Closer to the core.

 

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism
The climb ahead | Surrbhi Koul

 

Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism
Interiors of the cave (1) | Long exposures www.anirbansaha.com
Caving in Meghalaya, Meghalaya caves, Krem Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta, Gregory diengdoh, Meghalaya adventure tourism
Golden fish pond | www.anirbansaha.com

We had to walk from extreme left because on the right the pond had much more depth. A sharp drop. We had to walk on the extreme left, holding the wall, in waist deep water. That was scary. The real challenge was to get out of that pond. We were half inside water and had to climb around 6 or 7 feet using the rocks to move to the other section. Our boots were full of water and if we would fall back, we would have to swim with those non-existent gold fishes. Definitely none of us were in the mood to swim, we climbed up like champs! Surrbhi and I didn’t have anything to take care of except for ourselves. Anirban had his hundred thousand rupees camera hanging from his neck. Before entering the cave he calculated that if anything goes wrong he would save the camera before himself. His medical expenses would still be less than the cost of his gear. He took good care of his camera throughout. He himself also came out in one piece at the end of it. I wanted to see a bat and I thought we’ll see them hanging out somewhere. But they were all busy flying from here to there. Didn’t get a chance to see one properly.

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure
The water flowing by the side | www.anirbansaha.com

Some sections of the cave were huge. There is no evidence of any human inhabitation inside these caves. We were the first ones to enter the cave this year. That added to the excitement. There was water at many places in the cave. At some places the water was flowing like a stream. There was a big section in the cave where we walked on false floor. It is called false floor because that is not actually the ground. Under that floor there was a stream of water. The floor had numerous holes and gorges.

 

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism
The way forward | Closer to the core

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism

 

We could see the ground a few feet below. I had only heard about stalactites and stalagmites before and didn’t know what they were. Gregory showed us all the different kinds of formations and also told us how they are formed. Stalactites grow from the ceiling and stalagmites grow from the ground. A rare structure is formed when a stalactite meets a stalagmite to form a pillar. We saw that when we reached our destination, our picnic spot. The Hanging Gardens. Almost two kilometres inside the cave, was our final stop. This place had many more formations everywhere. We were asked to be extra careful and not walk anywhere without watching. There were cave curtains, that formed from the ceiling. And there was a structure that looked exactly like a ‘Shiv-ling’ – sacred stone.

Coincidence or miracle of Lord Shiva is upon you to decide. There were many stalactites and stalagmites at this place. Gregory went in a little deeper to take some readings. We could also  go in deeper but usually only those who have special interests go further. We took a closer look at the formations, drank water and ate some biscuits to regain energy. And of course clicked some pictures. The cave wasn’t being very kind to Anirban’s camera. There were sand inside his lens and water vapor condensed on the lens. The buttons didn’t work properly also. But he managed to shoot somehow. Gregory and Anirban found that spot, two kilometers inside the cave, a perfect place to discuss cave photography and try a few things out. We tried light painting but it was a failure.

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism
The picnic spot | Caving in Meghalaya
Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism
The formation inside | Caving in Meghalaya
Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism
The gorgeous interiors of the cave | www.anirbansaha.com

We spent some time at the picnic spot and decided to head back. We were taking the same way back. All the way in and back out Surrbhi walked ahead of us. She is someone who would trip on completely smooth and flat surfaces but surprisingly the cave dweller was doing a good job that day. Anirban seemed exhausted and walked slower. I walked with him. All the drops were now climbs. There was awesomeness flowing everywhere in our bodies and we crossed everything just as easily as before. Crossing the same places we had crossed before, when I looked back there was complete darkness. If your lights stop working two kilometres inside the cave, you’re as good as dead. If you’re deep inside the cave and it starts raining very heavily outside. The water starts flooding the cave and again you’re as good as dead. It was around 4 or 4.30 PM when we finally saw daylight again. We got out.

Caving in Meghalaya,   Meghalaya caves, Krem   Mawmluh, Harshit Mehta,   Gregory diengdoh,   Meghalaya adventure   tourism
“I screamed my lungs out. I had never felt like that in my entire life so far. It was easily the best experience of my life.”

I screamed my lungs out. I had never felt like that in my entire life so far. It was easily the best experience of my life. We talked, stretched, relaxed and drank water. It was a trek back up to reach where the car was. It was hot again. From the top of that hill when we looked down, we only saw the jungle. Not a hint of the cave. You can never guess there is a huge cave in there. We stopped for a while. No one said anything. We all had something going on in our heads. If you’ve watched Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara, the Bollywood movie, you’ll understand what feeling I’m talking about. We were so lost that we didn’t even care what way we were taking to get back to the car. Just kept walking. Anirban dropped his lens cover but luckily found it. It was right behind behind him. Surrbhi dropped her spectacles, didn’t bother to try finding it. We got into the car and headed back to our cottage. I only told people it was a great experience. I had no words to explain that feeling. Anirban asked me to write this and I think it’s a little too long but I had to include everything I could. When that feeling and memory will fade away, this post will help me re-live that day all over again. Though I plan on going again whenever I can. If you read this till the end, I think you’ll enjoy caving. More than anything else, the experience brings you closer to your own core. Your Life.”

একটু অন্য রকমের দীপাবলি ।

I wish you all a very happy festive season. Warm greetings on this auspicious occasion of Mahavir Nirvan Diwas, Kali Pujo, Naraka Chaturdashi and what is popularly known as “Diwali”.

mother teresa, missionaries of charity, diwali celebrationDebarshi Duttagupta, flying lantern, fanush, phanush

While most of us are celebrating “Diwali” across religions, regions, age groups and while most of my friends are shooting candles and Diyas or else partying, a few friends of mine were doing some real good job. While Aroop organised gifts and clothes for the Salt Lake slum dwellers, Asmita and her friends go to the Missionaries of Charity bursting crackers with the children and nuns there. Photographer Debarshi Dutta Gupta and his friends light flying lanterns in memory of those who have passed away in the last year.

Valmiki’s Ramayana reportedly has no Diwali in it. While the Jain texts mention this time to be the festival of lights after the Supreme light ( Lord Mahavir ) attained Nirvaan (Enlightenment/ Death) . The rulers of the land said that the Supreme light might have gone, but the event shall be marked by the earthen lights. “Diwali” is popularly known as the festival of lighting lamps across streets to mark the celebrations of Lord Rama to Ayodhya after having defeated the demon king Ravana. In Tamil culture, it is Naraka Chaturdashi where God Karthik and Goddess Kali killed a demon. In Bengal, this is the time for Bhoot Chaturdashi, where the spirits (read: Ghosts) roam around freely on the streets without restrictions and is followed by Kali Puja or worshipping Goddess Kali, the war Goddess and the Goddess often associated with excess power, ghostsand supernatural acts.

 

Did you know about Mahavir Nirvan Diwas?

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fanush, flying lantern, debarshi duttagupta, calcutta, kolkata
flying lantern, calcutta, debarshi duttaguptaflying lantern, calcutta, debarshi duttagupta
The flying lantern event was like a mini Kolkata Photography Club gathering, many of whose photographs I follow and have learnt from. I saw photographs last year and this year, I asked for an invitation for myself :D ..and took Saimantick with me.
Diwali at Missionaries of Charity, Kolkata, nun, diwali
asmita nandy, asmita nandi, asmita diwali, Diwali at Missionaries of Charity, Kolkata, nun, diwali
I wish I could spend some more time with them. I took a friend Rajatabha with me. He seemed fascinated and he appreciates the initiative to spend time with the children and nuns of Missionaries of Charity. He said he has personally conveyed his regards to Asmita. Another very small incident happened that touched both Rajatabha and me. Koustav bought a chocolate for a girl on the footpath. The girl did not run away taking the chocolate. She actually smiled and said a “Thank you”. Well, we all had smiles on our faces.
I am happy as long as my friends are happy and smiling. Both Saimantick and Rajatabha seemed very happy, (Koustav কে দেখে কিছুই বোঝা যায়ে না। আমার মনে হয়ে ওরও ভালোই লেগেছে।) ..and I seem to be the happiest person.

Rajatabha Ray, Missionaries of Charity
Photograph: Rajatabha Ray

 

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I’ll add a few photographs to this blog post sometime later today. Bhai Phonta time, you see.
How was your Diwali?

Meghalaya: Color-ob

People, India, Meghalaya, Khasi hills, tribes in Meghalaya, Harshit Mehta, Surrbhi Kaul

What did it feel like?

It felt like a cacophony of colours, colours everywhere.. the lush green fields, the darker green of the forest.. the wild red berries, the kids and their enthusiasm. The sky was a complete blue with shades of grey smudged. I wish I could photograph the yellow birds. Can you give me a better term  for “cacophony of colours”?

How about “Color-ob”?

It definitely had been a color-ob, the riot of colours outside and inside me, conflicting emotions up in arms against each other. The concrete junglees that we have become, do we not miss the blue sky we all romanticised about in our teens or perhaps the darker clouds which used to carry messages to our loved ones? The white patches of the Kaash flower dominated my senses. It was the Durga Puja.

Tired of frequently checking my WhatsApp, I decided to move slightly away from all the hustle of the live English music to this place, above which was a clear sky studded with small scintillating diamonds. The chill of the wind and the cold rock I laid on, mellowed my senses. No, I can not risk my dignity.

The dark of the night made way to a sun light in the clear sky. Harshit woke me up and went out to see the sun rising. By the time I arranged for the camera, the light of the sun put a smile on my face.

Meghalaya is a fresh start to my life. The calm blue of the sky smeared with the light grey and the white somewhere far there embraces the gigantic hills.

 

 

 

People, India, Meghalaya, Khasi hills, tribes in Meghalaya

 

 

 

People, Meghalaya, colours, travel, tourism, colours, trek, forest, gregory, harshit, kids

 

The kids were the flavour. Restless and camera shy, mostly they flock together and blow kisses to people who pass by. I spared a few moments with the group of young boys.

We walked through forests and small inhabited villages. It felt incredible. The green of the forest playing with the golden sun rays created magic in my mind.

 

People, Meghalaya, colours, travel, tourism, colours, trek, forest, gregory, harshit

 

The green and the blue acted like an intoxicant, it made me rediscover myself. The brooks and water falls, the narrow roads carved out of the rocks and the incessant but peaceful sound of the insects create a setting unmatched.  Meghalaya, ‘the abode of clouds’. An experience for the senses, an unexplored heaven.

 

Meghalaya tourism

 

People, India, Meghalaya, Khasi hills, tribes in Meghalaya

 

 

 

People, India, Meghalaya, Khasi hills, tribes in Meghalaya

 

 

 

People, Meghalaya, colours, travel, tourism, colours, trek, forest, gregory, harshit

 

 

 

People, Meghalaya, colours, travel, tourism, colours, trek, forest, gregory, harshit

 

 Which places did you visit? Did you go to the seven sister falls?

Well, that’s another blog post.

—-

“Color-ob” (Pronunciation: Caw-Loh-Rob / Kolorob): Korolob, in Bengali, means riotous noise.
The name is suggested by Parama Dasgupta, journalist working with the leading Bengali daily newspaper.
The blogpost has been edited by Surya Shekhar Chakraborty, Arkadyuti Palit, Arjyak Bhattacharya, Rupsha Bhadra
and reviewed by Preeti Roychowdhury and Sanveer Mehwal.

A photo blogger’s take on Plagiarism

Indian copyright act, photography, photographers India
 

 

 

From forwarding SMS’s to sharing content over the social media, we seem to be in a habit of copying content from one and publishing it from our profiles. This is scarily taken to the next level when the advertisement makers, “copy” photographs from the internet and use them while making advertisements.

Why is this scary? The advertisement maker, who designs the advertisement, is heavily paid for it. All s/he does, is to search, download, Photoshop and use. Not consulting the photographer or seeking permission. This is as good as stealing. In legal terms this is the theft of Intellectual property*.

Not only does the advertiser depriving the photographer of the money, which the photographer requires for a decent living and pursuing better photography, he is also promoting the idea of stealing and in my very honest opinion – killing the work culture and the enthusiasm an experienced photographer should have.

My primary source of income is not photography. Even then I feel terrible when I see my photograph stolen and made into government advertisements, book / magazine cover or a political party’s mass greetings card.

Picture this: You invest quite a good amount of time to understand, learn and master a technique and someone simply steals it without mentioning your name. How would you feel?

For example, the Tagore light painting: It took me around 3 hours of constant practice in the Dark room, painting in the air with the torch. One fine evening, a friend of mine informed me – it is printed in a big hoarding near Nandan. When I rushed there to see it, I saw my watermark was removed and it had become the face of an entire festival organized by a reputed theatre group. The festival was inaugurated by the then West Bengal Education minister.

Tagore light painting, plagiarism
Another day, another young friend informed me that the Tagore light painting had become the cover of a collection of Tagore short stories book, published by a reputed publisher based in Delhi. Considering all online and print publications, the Tagore light painting has been stolen more than 25 times.
Tagore light painting, jainco publisher plagiarism

Now picture this: You go to an unknown place just to discover the purest form of Baul music. You spend money seeking required permissions, paying performers, taking all related risks and doing the running around. One afternoon a friend tells me over WhatsApp, that it has been stolen and used in the State Government’s advertisement.

lok prasar prakalpa, plagiarism

My photographs have been stolen otherwise as well by state BJP, a magazine in Sri Lanka, a website in Dhaka. (I am not listing all)

BJP unit’s photo stealing:
Bijoya, BJP, plagiarism

Magazine in Sri Lanka:
plagiarism

Let me share a stray incident, which I forgot to mention while drafting this blogpost.

According to me, this is slightly more shameful and scary.
Don Bosco Park Circus

This is the official website of one of the most reputed boys school in Kolkata, listed in India’s Top 10 Boys schools this year. They search over the internet, take my photograph, use it. After having informed, they show no sense of apology, regret. Not even a personal message whatsoever. It is designed by school kids of class 10 – 12 and I took it lightly considering them kids. Today I ask, if this is not the age to build ethics, when shall it be appropriate? I do not expect students of reputed schools to steal and I’ll be honest about it.

 

We artists, invest our time to learn and execute the art form. If someone steals our work, we feel more deprived. Not always do we require money in exchange of the work but our pleasure lies in the mention of our name along with the piece of art.

Each time someone downloads music illegally, e.g. – an Indian classical music CD (since I know a few musicians closely), you are depriving him of money. He needs money to survive and pursue his music to create further music. We photographers need money to buy better gears & better photographs. And if not gears, we require money for basic survival. So each time you are illegally downloading and using something, remember – you are pushing someone to death, very slowly and mercilessly.

Coming to the legal aspect of it: This is covered under the Indian Copyright Act. And I am told by my lawyer, every time I press the shutter, I hold the right to publish and distribute the photograph. If you are shooting it on behalf of a company, the company holds the right to publish the photograph.

Can legal action be taken? The answer is yes, if proven. If it is online, it can be taken down after a police report. But if it is offline, the case becomes more credible and easy to prove.

Check a few graphics I made for the Indian Copyright Act, 1957.

There are a few people who contest the thought. In a way, they support plagiarism. A friend of mine once told: in this age of social media, there should not be strict copyright laws as the content is up on public display. Another much respected elder said that she and her company often do that. She does not see any harm in it, as it is open to be accessed. To me, this logic is as credible as this: “She is raped because she wore short clothes; she is raped because she was alone on the streets.

I am not sure about other photographers. But as I keep blogging, my reach will only increase making my photographs easily discoverable over the search engine and open to stealing. I put my email address and phone number along with the blog post where I publish the photograph. If someone wants it, might just give me a call seeking permission. I ask money only if I have invested money for the shot. Even if I have invested money, at times I do not charge money if I am approached properly with dignity. Example: Daricha foundation used my photographs of Tusu; Bengali Association of Greater Atlanta (BAGA) used my Tagore light painting. They were kind enough to seek permission. Not only did I allow them to use my photographs for free, we are in good terms now and share a bond of mutual respect.

Do I stop blogging? Perhaps, no, it is only because of blogging, a few brands like Harley Davidson, Rolling stone magazine had earlier approached me and now I am shooting for the social media promotion of another globally recognised clothing brand. I’m happy that there are people who are not as ignorant.

Udaan magazine
There is a some silver lining: Udaan Bengali travel magazine was in need of a photograph of Boshonto Utshob. They searched the internet and found a photograph from my blog shot by Pratyay Mukhopadhyay. They asked for permission from both me and Pratyay and the next month, the photograph became the cover photograph of the magazine.

The number of rapes however is not coming down in any parameter of statistics. Not that my blog post would change the photography thieves any drastically. But we can spread the awareness of intellectual property rights, share contact details of lawyers who have already fought similar cases. We should be more aware of safeguarding our creations and spreading the awareness to create a better world. Read about Indian Copyright Act 1957. More than the artists who still now are a minority, it is you readers who can make a difference. You need to be aware and spread the awareness.